Bucks County Real Estate in 7 Graphs

Posted on May 16, 2016


Want to know where to live in Bucks County? This infographic is for you.

Today’s post is for all the Bucks County fans out there. Located north of Philadelphia county, Bucks county was one of the three original William Penn settlements. It has a population of 625,249, making it the fourth-most populous county in Pennsylvania. After reviewing the real estate numbers for a handful of areas, we have chosen to highlight real estate facts for these 4 boroughs and townships: Doylestown, New Hope, Yardley, and Warminster.

Let’s take a moment to get acquainted with these areas – from necessary facts to random trivia.

Doylestown

  • Home to many mighty women: nobel Prize-winning author Pearl S. Buck, anthropologist Margaret Mead, and pop-rock star Pink.
  • M. Night Shyamalan fans may recognize Doylestown as the filming location for his 2002 film Signs. The location of the film is cited as “Bucks County, PA” in the film. Filming was done in a corn field that forms part of the campus of Delaware Valley University.
  • It’s a nice in between spot: it is located 27 miles north of Philadelphia and 80 miles south of New York City.
  • You can take this lovely self-guided walking tour should you fancy a walk about town

New Hope

  • Reigns as the most expensive real estate market in PA. The infographic below illustrates this powerfully.
  • New Hope has historically been a popular spot for Broadway shows to be tested and fine tuned, and many notable stage actors have bought weekend homes in the area.
  • New Hope’s primary industry is tourism. On weekends, the streets are crowded with tourists visiting the many restaurants, antique shops, and art galleries, or taking the popular walk along the river and the Delaware Canal. Compared to surrounding communities, New Hope has a vibrant night life.

Yardley

  • The Train Collectors Association, which now boasts worldwide membership of 30,000 individuals, was founded in Yardley in 1954.
  • This one I love and had to include: The Yardley Yeti – On June 6, 1866, reports of a wolf-like creature attacking a group of canal boat travelers were filed with the local authorities (these documents are preserved today at Yardley Borough Hall). Sightings of the wolf have increased over the years, although the stories remain questionable. The only known photo was taken in 1978 by local Yardley resident Theodore Sheffield. The photo shows what appears to be a large wolf-like creature. Today, most of the residents reject such claims and attribute the wolf to myth and folklore.
  • According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough has a total area of 1.0 square mile (2.6 km2), of which, 0.9 square miles of it is land and 0.1 square miles of it (9.90%) is water.

Warminster

  • It is located 3.7 miles northwest of Philadelphia, the closest of all the areas mentioned here.
  • This event is a real thing and I love it. Going on 21 years strong!
  • Warminster Township encourages energy efficiency and conservation. Leading by example, Warminster purchases 20% of it’s electricity from renewable sources. Warminster received the 2009 Green Power: Turn It On! Award from Citizens for Pennsylvania’s Future (PennFuture).

Moving on to real estate – we’ll let the numbers tell the story.

Bucks County Infographic

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